Allen's Blog

10 results found for ‘d800’:

A Retrospective on Camera Bags (With a Twist)

Over the past 50 years, I’ve traveled with and depended on a variety of bags, starting in the late ’60s with a fishing tackle bag from Abercrombie & Fitch. Then I discovered the series of beautiful canvas and leather Brady Bags, made by hand in England since the late 1800s. While Brady now makes dedicated camera bags, my career favorites were the Ariel Trout and Gelderburn models, designed for fishermen and still in production. Artisanally made and now quite expensive, I don’t think they’re what I’d carry around the world today.

From there, it was on to the first version of the Domke Bag, designed by Jim Domke, a photojournalist for the Philadelphia Inquirer. He based his design on (no surprise) a fishing bag that he had been using. He wrote about its development a few years ago, and mentions several names you’ll surely recognize, including our old friends Marty Forscher and David Burnett. The Domke brand has grown (now owned by Tiffen), but new players have entered the market, and to my mind and experience the bags from Think Tank are game changers in many ways. Their latest is a line of camera bags called Retrospective v2.0 (there’s the twist I mentioned), and here’s why I’m such a satisfied customer:

Think Tank Retrospective bag, in profile First of all, they don’t call attention to themselves. As I wrote some time ago, you never want your bags and straps to shout “steal me”. If they do, make it a priority to replace the offending parts… or cover them with several patches of gaff tape so they look worn-out.

Secondly, these bags make the best use of Velcro and useful compartments I’ve ever seen. The available sizes are each designed to accommodate and protect a different configuration of gear, including tablets and laptops, which they make very clear on their website. I find that the Retrospective 5, the smallest in the line, is perfect for carrying my Fuji X-E2, two lenses, an iPad, and various chargers and accessories. My Nikon D800 would be equally well-served by the Retrospective 7.

Think Tank Retrospective bag, open with Fuji camera

Other thoughtful touches abound: Every bag comes with a rain cover even though there is real moisture resistance in the bags’ fabric itself; the shoulder strap is incredibly comfortable; there are zippered pockets where you need them; Velcro-secured flaps can be disengaged where you need to keep as quiet as possible; and the bags really conform to your body while carried over the shoulder.

I suppose I should apologize for carrying on, but I find these Think Tank bags to be nothing short of brilliant!

Think Tank Retrospective bag, as camera support

David Burnett Has Switched from Canon to Sony, and Will Remain a Great Photographer

A major piece of news rocked the Internet this week (and best of all, it didn’t involve Donald Trump). Our dear friend David Burnett announced that he was trading in his Canon gear for Sony. Hear it in his own words:

CanonToSony 1 from David Burnett on Vimeo.

To “change horses” after 40 years is notable for any photographer, whether professional or amateur. Naturally, there were detractors who claimed Sony paid him off for the endorsement. I suppose they parked a dump truck full of money in his driveway, per standard operating procedure. Kidding aside, the fact remains that David continues to earn his living as he always has – by the images his hardware turns out (with some small contribution from the 8-9 inches of “bio-ware” right behind it.) It seems clear to me that David mentioned the switch for the same reason any of us might post a status update on his blog – he’s excited about what it means for the future, and he wants to share that feeling with us.

Over the years there have been posts right here on our blog about this same topic: Raj Tavadia, our technology director, posted two widely-read guest blogs describing his experience switching from Canon to Fuji, and I posted my own impressions later that year when I traded in my oldest Nikons for a Fuji X-E2. Where, may I ask, were those dump trucks full of money, then?

Rather than standardizing on one system, I have preferred to choose what feels like the “right” camera or lens for the day, whether a Nikon D series, Fuji X, Canon G, Sony RX, or Apple iPhone. Just a different way of working; you could make a strident defense of either method. And if that interests you, you’ve come to the right place – the Internet, it turns out, is better suited for almost nothing more in Creation than holding vigorous, pointless arguments with total strangers. (Thank goodness for cute cat pictures, which seem to be the only thing everyone can still get behind.)

David Burnett's press pass from the 1988 Olympics

Now I’m not going to speak for David – who has continued to turn out world-class work as much as he ever has – but I wonder if his decision was influenced by the notion that it can be healthy for one’s creativity to change his tools after a certain amount of time. It doesn’t hurt that so much of the recent progress in photography has come out of Sony, both in terms of design and manufacturing. Their sensors have powered all of the Nikon D800 series, for instance, as well as many iPhones. It stands to reason that they’d hold some of their best stuff back for their own-brand cameras. Meanwhile, Canon admits that they’re not innovating as quickly as they should.

Aside from his new adventures in Sony land, I do hope that he’ll continue to use that big, beautiful Speed Graphic as well as anything, large or small, that lets him keep creating images that stun us, inspire us, and make us laugh.

Sometimes, It’s As Easy As Stepping Out the Door

Jade vine flowers in the reflecting pond

A few months ago, I wrote about visiting the annual Orchid Show at the New York Botanical Garden. I went there in order to see the beauty on display, of course, and also to watch photographers of all skill levels (and “gear levels”) capture the images they wanted to keep and share. My own personal favorite pictures were the dropped petals from a jade orchid that landed in a reflecting pool. I was inspired enough to make multiple trips just to capture these flowers in different ways.

Fuji X-E2 taking macro photo of morning glory flowers

Earlier this summer, we decided to grow morning glories in pots on the deck of our home. The light is perfect early in the day, and in a very small area, here were the flowers in all stages of their growth. Two minutes later and I’ve got my Fuji X-E2 with the 60mm macro in place. Five minutes after that, I’ve got a lovely set of images.

Of course, I could have shot this with my Nikon D800 and 105mm Macro, but it was just so much easier to maneuver the Fuji. Another example of why the new generation of small cameras with large sensors have become the dominant source of buzz in serious photography. I bought the first generation Sony RX100 when it first came out, and it is still an amazing camera. But now I have my eyes set on the RX100 IV, for which the reviews have been a series of raves, and whose specs, including 4K, high frame-rate video, are just incredible. At nearly $1000, it’s no casual purchase and should come with a one-on-one week-long tutorial instead of the usual 200-page manual. But do I really need it? (At my age, the answer is probably “no.”)

Steal-Me-branded-camera-strap

One more quick note, this time about SLRs and the straps they come with – I know that Canon, Nikon and others are very proud to have thought of weaving their brand names and model numbers right into the straps, but fair warning: a strap that proclaims Nikon D810 or any other expensive designation is great free advertising and promotion for the companies, but they might as well add the words ‘steal me.’ Out on the street, I look for opportunities to advise unwary shooters to immediately order a top-quality but unbranded strap. (I don’t mind if their parting thought, as I stride off into the sunset, is “just who was that annoying man?”)

Many thanks to Ben Salter for releasing the image of his Canon 50D under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 license. Yes, we’ve modified the image a bit!