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Joshua Paul – Capturing the Soul of F1 Racing

Anyone who knows me will confirm I’ve always had a fondness for cars. Given the slightest prompting, I’ll wax poetic about the bygone era when I lived in New York City and parked my Alfa Romeo on the street overnight (with the top down!!) And whenever the opportunity presents itself, I make it a point to go out and appreciate the fine details of classic cars – most of them also of a bygone era.

So I’m delighted to discover and share with you the work of Joshua Paul, who’s recently received attention across the blogosphere for his images which seem to have emerged from [all together, now!] a bygone era. Josh could be considered the driving force behind Lollipop GP, a photography magazine dedicated to the thrill of Formula 1. Have a look at Josh’s Instagram feed, and I’m sure you’ll agree he succeeds at finding the essence of the sport. There’s nothing better, short of actually being there to experience the roar, the heat, the smell, and the dazzle with your own senses.

Part of Josh’s style is his use of a classic camera, the Graflex 4×5 – a chimney-style SLR now over 100 years old. Based on the quality of his other images, it’s clearly a stylistic choice, not a gimmick. I was instantly reminded of one of my longest-known friends, David Burnett, who, if you haven’t seen previous mentions on this blog, you may recognize as “that one guy who used a Speed Graphic to cover the Olympics… and the Vietnam war… and presidential campaigns since JFK’s… and coups d’etat, famines, revolutions, and the various other things you come across during a 50-year career“. David happily makes use of modern equipment – he regularly carried two Canon 5D bodies, in that camera’s heyday, and has made striking images on everything from a Mamiya to a Holga. But he found his muse in the Pacemaker Speed Graphic 4×5, which he often mated to the 1943 Kodak Aero-Ektar, a 178mm f/2.5 lens originally used on World War 2 spy planes.

Now, to be clear – I’m sure that every other photographer in the images above worked very hard to get where they are and to come away from the gig with great images. The days are long, the bags are heavy (especially with those 400mm lenses), and the business side is more competitive than ever. And let’s not even get into how miserable it is to fly, these days…

Nevertheless, in the age of 20 fps motor drives and multi-lens cellphones, there’s just something wonderful about watching Josh and David use their imaginations to push their ancient technologies of choice in new directions. As Ansel Adams famously said, “the single most important component of a camera is the twelve inches behind it.”

As I write this, issue #4 of Lollipop should be shipping soon; issue #3 still shows limited quantities available and can be ordered on Lollipop-GP.com. Coming in at 228 pages, it looks absolutely beautiful – not just in terms of images, but also graphic design. As for David, two of his books are currently available on Amazon: one, a chronicle of Bob Marley and the other reggae icons he encountered on tour in the late 70s, and the other documenting the fall of the Shah of Iran, the rise of the Ayatollah, and the ensuing hostage crisis.

Lordy… What a Light!

Thanks to James Comey for legitimizing my use of ‘Lordy,’ but a product I’ve been using recently has been just astonishing in what it can do in a package so small it belongs in every shooter’s gear bag.

Aladdin Eye-Light BiIt’s called the Aladdin Eye-Lite Bi. Distributed in the U.S. by Zylight, it’s a bicolor LED light that fits in your hand and is rated to run continuously for two hours (or far longer, if you don’t mind plugging in via micro USB). Color temperature is adjustable from 2900–6400K; a second dial controls dimming from 5–100%. Unlike many of the cheap “me too” LEDs we’ve complained about over the years, the Eye-Lite Bi’s color rendering is excellent – 95 CRI/TLCI.

Its 3.5” x 1.5”aluminum housing is sturdy and weighs a mere 2 ounces. The micro USB port is along the top side, and the ¼-20 tripod thread along the bottom can certainly come in handy when shoe-mounting to your camera or a mini tripod. There’s even a small loop built into one corner, about zip-tie size, if that’s how you like to keep things organized. It’s not cheap—it’ll run you about $160 at your local camera store—but it is worth it! (If you can get by on a non-bicolor version, you may still be able to find Aladdin’s previous models for a few bucks less; I first saw them at NAB a few years ago, and was impressed, but I feel that the bicolor version is a truly outstanding product.)

Aladdin Eye-Lite used as fill light

For its size, it puts out a lot of light, and you can easily tape any diffusion or color gels over the LED array. It is a terrific tool for close-up work, and I can see wide use in forensics. Anyone shooting with a macro lens, whether nature close-ups, food, jewelry, or scientific imaging, will see its usefulness. When you have a light source this small (and therefore this maneuverable), adjustments are incredibly easy.

I used it recently while photographing a necklace made by Martha’s Vineyard artist Kate Taylor. The materials are wampum, sea glass, and gold beads. While the image with no supplemental lighting is fine (if a bit flat), adding the Eye-Lite made a real difference in depth and dimensionality.

Product shot - before and after

As many of you know, I’m always looking for new products that extend our creativity, and this is one of several that I’ll be writing about in the next few weeks.

Celebrate What’s Right With the World

We find ourselves this week at the end of an absolutely brutal political campaign. The phrase “worst election ever” is thrown around by both sides nearly every four years, but this year seems unlikely to be surpassed for decades (or so we hope). According to the Pew Research Center, literally half of either side is ‘afraid’ of the other party. And as many feared, the turmoil has not subsided as the contest ended; indeed, many tempers seem to be worsening as the transfer of power begins.

As we contemplate our role in this new world, I ask you to take another look at some of the precious details you may have forgotten were there all along, being masked by all the noise and vitriol. A moment of Zen is in order, even if only to recharge your batteries in order to better stand up for what you believe in. 


Dewitt Jones, former National Geographic photographer and a collaborator and friend of ours for years, publishes an ongoing project called “Celebrate What’s Right With the World!” Dewitt has a knack for discovering beauty and peace in natural scenes (though he might characterize these as “revelations” rather than “discoveries”). His project has evolved over the years from a film, to a website, to an entire community of like-minded people posting their own celebrations of life for all to enjoy. Most of the action takes place on his Facebook page, but if that’s not your style, you can choose to follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or join his mailing list. Whatever your choice, I hope you’ll spend a few moments at the end of a tumultuous week scrolling through Dewitt’s images, and that they bring you some wonder, joy, inspiration, or peace. 

Objects of Desire (or Vigorous Want, at Least) at PhotoPlus Expo 2016

The exhibits have been taken down at NYC’s Javits Center, and PhotoPlus Expo 2016 is now in the past. It’s always a pleasure to run into friends and dealers while touring the show floor, as we all oooh and ahhh at the shiny new gizmos on display, and start to make mental notes of which ones we’re going to start saving for. Here’s a recap of some of what’s new and what is changing in how we’ll shoot pictures and video this year…

nikon-booth-at-ppe-2016

A Death Spiral for DSLRs?

Well, probably more like a steep loss of altitude. As always, Nikon and Canon were out in force, and lots of fans were there to see and play with their new toys. But the real action was to be found at mirrorless vendors like Sony, and Fuji, and Lumix. I’ve never seen a presentation like Sony’s before. Their range of mirrorless cameras and the vast array of optics they showed drew crowds from the moment the doors opened.

Sony booth at PPE 2016

Sony lenses at PPE 2016

The capabilities of these cameras, both in still and 4K video, are astonishing. It’s why my full-frame DSLRs now spend much of their time on the shelf. It’s also why these cameras are being widely used in professional video production and why companies like Zeiss are making feature-worthy optics to fit them.

It’s no surprise that Fotodiox (about whom I’ve written before) is continually expanding their range of adapters to ensure that virtually any lens can be used with any of the new cameras, in most cases transferring their auto-focus technology at the same time. I love being able to use vintage Leica M-series optics on my Fuji X-E2, particularly for portraiture.

And I’ll never be smart enough to figure out how Lumix (and others) can offer a camera with a 24-480mm optical zoom and a host of other phenomenal features that weighs not much more than my 43-86 Zoom-Nikkor from the late ’60s (still languishing in a desk drawer).

Lensbaby Trio28 at PPE 2016

Accessories of Note

Even though I had very high regard for the unique products they brought to photographers, I’ve never owned a Lensbaby product. It’s probably because, through decades of photojournalism work, I avoided anything that modified the images I produced. But things change, and I was intrigued to learn about their Trio 28 for mirrorless cameras. It produces three versatile effects on a rotating mount over a 28mm lens (effectively 42mm on my Fuji). I played with it at the show, and I’m looking forward to seeing what I can do with it soon.

ThinkTank Red Whips at PPE 2016

I’ve been using Think Tank memory card wallets for years, but wasn’t aware of their full range of products. Here’s one that everyone needs: Red Whips adjustable elastic cable ties. Managing cords and cables at home or on location is a real pain, and a package of these would be the perfect stocking stuffer (along with a pack of our microGAFFER – a favorite on holiday shopping lists year after year!)

Op/Tech USA is a company with a vast range of accessories, some of which I’ve been using for a long time. At PhotoPlus Expo, I tried a new camera strap they call the “Envy” on my Fuji mirrorless. It’s got a slim profile and is padded with memory foam. Op/Tech makes hundreds of products, and I plan to put the Envy strap on all my camera bodies. You’ve gotta love that—just like us—they’re proud to stamp the “Made in the USA” banner on practically all their products, and even produced a behind-the-scenes look into their workshop.

Phoxi FriendsMy best-in-show award for accessories, however, would have to go to Phoxi Friends. Marie Murray, a Canadian children’s photographer, has come up with a range of delightful creatures (with built-in squeakers) that wrap around the barrel of any lens and instantly engage any subject, particularly small children. Any photographer who’s struggled to get and hold the attention of a kid or pet knows how tough that can be. At her modest booth on the fringes of the exhibit floor, I watched dozens of attendees walk away with their new Phoxi Friends.

“Your New York Minute” Photo Contest

Not to forget what all this stuff is for — helping great photographers capture great images — PPE’s first official photo contest was held at the show, with the City of New York as its subject. Some magnificent images were chosen, both in the Amateur and Professional categories. Take a look, and be inspired!

Live News Stand-Ups in the Age of Internet Memes

Used to be if you were doing a live shot during a local or network news broadcast, all you had to worry about was the ‘Hi Mom’ sign being lifted up behind you during your stand-up. But as NBC’s Katy Tur found out on May 27th in San Diego, it’s gotten a bit more risky.

Fuck Trump sign

Tur has been the principal reporter covering the Trump campaign for Nightly News, and when it’s a single-camera shoot, there’s no way to cut away from an offensive graphic in the crowd. The best you can hope for is to move your correspondent out of the line of fire and pan back to her in a graphically safer setting. Having directed a lot of live TV news, I can easily visualize the scene in the control room during the nine seconds this was on air on the East Coast. Guaranteed there was a cleaner version for all the other time zones.

Super Fight II: Muhammad Ali & Joe Frazier’s Rematch at Madison Square Garden

Ali-Frazier ticket stub

Sports photography was never my strong suit back in the day; I did far better with crime, politics, and the arts.

A few weeks ago, as part of a quiet afternoon at home, I was sorting through a box of memorabilia. Had I not come across this ticket stub for the Ali-Frazier rematch at Madison Square Garden, I don’t think I’d have remembered this assignment.

I grew up in a one-channel town during the early days of television, and if you weren’t of driving age, the Gillette Friday Night Fights was the most excitement you could hope for. So all those years later, the call to be ringside at the Garden myself was a very big deal.

Ali-Frazier rematch, Madison Square Garden, 1974

It was the one and only time I ever saw Ali (or Frazier) in action, but given the enormous and well-deserved attention given to his passing a few days ago, I wanted to share an image of what was called Super Fight II. Ali won in a unanimous decision.

Lastly, and not to be missed, this 2014 post at The Guardian collects some of the greatest images of Muhammad Ali.