Allen's Blog

The Nine Days of POTUS

It’s become part of the summer routine for President Obama and his family to spend a week or so here on Martha’s Vineyard, much of it with old friends and with a lot of hours on the Vineyard’s several golf courses. In the past, my work for the Vineyard Gazette has put me in the middle of things, but this year I had no intention of getting caught up in any of it.

Obama_Vineyard_vacation_front_page

So, Thursday morning two weeks ago (Day 6 of the visit), when I heard the sound of Eight Harleys Roaring (past our house) and turning down the road towards the neighboring golf course, I knew that would be followed by Twenty Agents Guarding and One POTUS Golfing. While the State Police motorcycle escort took a break, I stayed inside, determined to let things be. But then, Julia Wells, the Gazette’s editor texted and asked by to see what I could produce in the way of pictures when the President arrived at the 8th green. Mr. Obama likes his privacy (who can blame him) — just ask Gazette staffer Ivy Ashe, who dutifully spent a day in the press pool from 8:30 AM until after midnight and never got a glimpse of Mr. Obama. FYI, the Gazette, founded in 1846, is one of the great local papers in the U.S. and well worth reading. Their presses roll each Thursday night in Edgartown, Mass.

I respect the Secret Service’s routines, and it all makes very good sense. The President came over to a group of us, and I got the front page of that week’s edition. The light was a nightmare — deep shadows where we were (his cap and sunglasses didn’t help) and strong sunlight on the green behind him. For those interested, it was shot with my Nikon D800 and the very, very good 24-70/f2.8. Steve Durkee, the paper’s design wizard, opened up the shadows, making for a fine picture, both in print and online. For other images — a quick change to the 70-200mm.

President Obama leaving the putting green

While on the subject of gear, I’ve been helping the friend of a friend dispose of some vintage Leica rangefinder equipment, and at the same time I’m seriously looking into buying one of Fuji’s X-series cameras. Beyond all the rave reviews these cameras are getting, with comparisons to the Leica M-series (both film and digital) making for some very good reading, it’s interesting to put an M3 next to the Fuji X-E1. There’s never been a camera that felt as natural in my hands as the M3 (or the M4 for that matter). That’s a large part of why this group of Fuji cameras is so appealing. It’s not that they consciously set out to copy Leica’s design (or maybe they did), but rather that they have made the “feel,” the ergonomics of the camera, such an important consideration, just as the engineers at Leica did more than 50 years ago. If I were starting a long assignment right now, and had to lock in to one camera to document all aspects of the trip, it almost certainly would be one of these.

Fuji X-E1 and Leica M3 (top view)

The next thing I’m looking for is WiFi capability. No hurry at the moment. I’m hoping the PhotoPlus show in NYC next month will help clear the air (and my mind). I see that Fuji have reserved a healthy-sized booth… what do you suppose they’ll be showing off?