Allen's Blog

Posts tagged ‘Nikon’:

David Burnett Has Switched from Canon to Sony, and Will Remain a Great Photographer

A major piece of news rocked the Internet this week (and best of all, it didn’t involve Donald Trump). Our dear friend David Burnett announced that he was trading in his Canon gear for Sony. Hear it in his own words:

To “change horses” after 40 years is notable for any photographer, whether professional or amateur. Naturally, there were detractors who claimed Sony paid him off for the endorsement. I suppose they parked a dump truck full of money in his driveway, per standard operating procedure. Kidding aside, the fact remains that David continues to earn his living as he always has – by the images his hardware turns out (with some small contribution from the 8-9 inches of “bio-ware” right behind it.) It seems clear to me that David mentioned the switch for the same reason any of us might post a status update on his blog – he’s excited about what it means for the future, and he wants to share that feeling with us.

Over the years there have been posts right here on our blog about this same topic: Raj Tavadia, our technology director, posted two widely-read guest blogs describing his experience switching from Canon to Fuji, and I posted my own impressions later that year when I traded in my oldest Nikons for a Fuji X-E2. Where, may I ask, were those dump trucks full of money, then?

Rather than standardizing on one system, I have preferred to choose what feels like the “right” camera or lens for the day, whether a Nikon D series, Fuji X, Canon G, Sony RX, or Apple iPhone. Just a different way of working; you could make a strident defense of either method. And if that interests you, you’ve come to the right place – the Internet, it turns out, is better suited for almost nothing more in Creation than holding vigorous, pointless arguments with total strangers. (Thank goodness for cute cat pictures, which seem to be the only thing everyone can still get behind.)

Now I’m not going to speak for David – who has continued to turn out world-class work as much as he ever has – but I wonder if his decision was influenced by the notion that it can be healthy for one’s creativity to change his tools after a certain amount of time. It doesn’t hurt that so much of the recent progress in photography has come out of Sony, both in terms of design and manufacturing. Their sensors have powered all of the Nikon D800 series, for instance, as well as many iPhones. It stands to reason that they’d hold some of their best stuff back for their own-brand cameras. Meanwhile, Canon admits that they’re not innovating as quickly as they should.

Aside from his new adventures in Sony land, I do hope that he’ll continue to use that big, beautiful Speed Graphic as well as anything, large or small, that lets him keep creating images that stun us, inspire us, and make us laugh.

The “Other” Competitors at the U.S. Open

Early 80s Nikon ad (scanned by Esox lucius @

When Canon first decided to get really competitive in high-end SLR cameras and lenses, a field totally dominated by Nikon and long before the digital era, some marketing genius realized that those white barrels on long lenses would stand out both on television and to the crowds at sporting events. And that helps sell gear.

I know that there are those who maintain it’s all about the fact that white reflects, rather than absorbs, heat and that this better protects some of Canon’s lens elements.

I prefer to see it as a way to literally improve Canon’s visibility in the pro photographic marketplace. And it worked. The lenses were (and are) great, and after a while it seemed that there was a sea of white telephotos and the occasional Nikon interloper at the Super Bowl, the World Series, etc. It’s no secret or accident that Nikon did a great job of matching or beating the competition (I’m a Nikon shooter for a full 50 years), and I still find myself taking a quick survey whenever TV coverage provides a view of the still photo corral at a major event.

Canon L lenses at the 2013 US Open

That was the case during the semis of the U.S. Open this week in New York. Late in the match, there was about a ten-second cutaway when the announcers were calling attention to the fact that all photographic eyes were on Djkovic just before the victory that would put him in the finals. With always-helpful TiVo, I froze the scene and did a quick and totally unscientific lens count — at that moment, at least, the results were 7-5 in Canon’s favor. Of course, had CBS’s camera panned a bit left or right, the numbers might easily have been reversed.

The only point here is that competition is healthy on and off the court.