Allen's Blog

Posts tagged ‘vintage’:

Classic Cars at the Greenwich Concours d’Elegance

Note: If you enjoy these images, I’ve uploaded many more to our social media channels. Please enjoy them no matter which platform you prefer: Facebook, Flickr, Google+.

Taillight from a classic ChevyFor almost 20 years, a big event on the local calendar has been the annual Greenwich Concours d’Elegance, a great competition and display of beautiful U.S. and foreign automobiles, with a separate auction of another group of classics. Back in the ’70s, I started photographing (on Kodachrome, of course) details of vintage cars. Never the whole vehicle, just intersections of color, chrome, and beautifully formed sheet metal. Over the years, these images were published widely, including as a group of posters for a Japanese tire company.

As digital photography took over from film, I held back on resuming the project, since I wasn’t sure the technology would be up to Kodachrome standards. But my Nikon D800 (with the 105mm macro lens) has leveled that playing field. I got lucky this past weekend with fine weather and a superb array of automobiles. Unless you know a whole lot about great old cars, or you’re beyond a certain age, some of the names may meet with a total lack of recognition. In any case, here’s a sampling. I deliberately stayed away from the Ferraris, Porsches, Mercedes, and Rolls Royce/Bentley examples… they’re a dime a dozen around here.

Even Buick, for a couple of decades now seemingly the choice of no one under the age of 70, was well represented by some 1950s beauties… does the name Roadmaster provoke a shiver of recognition?

Tail fin from a classic Cadillac Delahaye emblem and grill

A car-loving photographer's dream afternoon!

Tiltall: The Definitive Tripod

Tiltall tripod (photo by user 'voytek' on mflenses.com)

Ozzie Sweet, maybe the all-time numbers champ in terms of magazine cover photos died two weeks ago at age 94. I knew the name, but the obit by NY Times writer Bruce Weber was a mother lode of information. One of the three photos in the obit was a self-portrait from the 1980s, showing Sweet with a massive telephoto lens mounted on a Hasselblad, the rig supported on a tripod I recognized instantly – the Tiltall. That brought back a whole lot of memories since in the day, Tiltall was the definitive tripod. Made in New Jersey by the Marchioni Brothers and later licensed to Leitz for broader marketing, the Tiltall was beautifully made of machined aluminum, sturdy, durable, and with a full range of easy adjustments. I finally lost mine to the PanAm baggage system, and by then it had disappeared from the marketplace.

In writing this, I just discovered more about Tiltall, the Marchioni Brothers, and where the product has been and is now, courtesy of Gary Regester’s blog. FYI, you’ll learn more about Gary, whom I met 30 years ago and who was the first in the industry to come up with the collapsible soft-light bank.