Flexfill

The “Nature” of Quick and Dirty Macro Photography

Great close-up nature photography doesn’t have to involve a lot of equipment (and weight or bulk). I almost always have with me, besides the latest in Canon’s G-series of professional quality point-and-shoot cameras, a couple of our smallest Flexfill collapsible lighting reflectors, a Steadybag Jr., and a table-top tripod and head.

Comparison of an open 20-inch Flexfill with an identical closed model inside its storage pouch

We’ve been bothered at home by an invasion of what I just learned are cicada-killing wasps. Earlier today, I watched one of these airborne attackers start to drag his latest victim under our porch. A quick shot of hornet spray took care of the wasp, but it was too late for the cicada. But in a couple of minutes, using a white Flexfill (model 20-1) as a shooting surface and a silk Flexfill (model 20-9) to diffuse a very harsh sun, I was able to produce a studio-quality image of both.

Insects on a white Flexfill

The Canon G11 has extraordinary macro capabilities (plus I always try to shoot RAW files), and since I was shooting down, my Leica ball head and tripod was the choice over the Steadybag.

The silk Flexfill was the key to the shot, allowing the G11 to make a correct exposure even in bright sunlight. Each of the 20-inch Flexfills weighs less than 5 ounces, expands to a 20″ circle, folds down instantly to about one-third that size, and fits into its own 8″ pouch. Flexfills come in a variety of sizes, up to 60″ across, and all of them are similarly compact, lightweight, and reliable.

Next up: using the ultra-cool LitePad (Rosco’s LED light panel) to produce a location food photograph at the edge of the ocean.